Mission Moments

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Each day as part of our University Daily Update, we provide a short reflection, prayer, video or other work in the hopes of bringing comfort to our University community.

March 17, 2020: A video message from Fr. Curran
March 18, 2020: "Lockdown," by Bro. Richard Hendrick
March 19, 2020: "A Prayer for Our Times," by Cindy Schmersal, vice president of Mission and Ministry
March 20, 2020: A video message from Fr. Curran
March 23, 2020: "Pandemic," by Lynn Ungar
March 24, 2020: Prayer for People Critically Ill or Facing Great Uncertainty, adapted from New Zealand Prayer Book, p. 765 
March 25, 2020: “Discerning a Path to God,” from the Rev. Arturo Sosa, S.J., and “Discernment in the Cave,” a four-part digital retreat
March 26, 2020: Untitled poem by Laura Kelly Fanucci
March 27, 2020: A video message from Fr. Curran
April 2, 2020: Campus Ministry Wednesday Weekly Jams
April 3, 2020: Video message from Fr. Curran


A video message from Fr. Curran


 

“Lockdown,” by Brother Richard Hendrick

Lockdown

Yes there is fear.
Yes there is isolation.
Yes there is panic buying.
Yes there is sickness.
Yes there is even death.
But,
They say that in Wuhan after so many years of noise
You can hear the birds again.
They say that after just a few weeks of quiet
The sky is no longer thick with fumes
But blue and grey and clear.
They say that in the streets of Assisi
People are singing to each other
across the empty squares,
keeping their windows open
so that those who are alone
may hear the sounds of family around them.
They say that a hotel in the West of Ireland
Is offering free meals and delivery to the housebound.
Today a young woman I know
is busy spreading fliers with her number
through the neighbourhood
So that the elders may have someone to call on.
Today Churches, Synagogues, Mosques and Temples
are preparing to welcome
and shelter the homeless, the sick, the weary
All over the world people are slowing down and reflecting
All over the world people are looking at their neighbours in a new way
All over the world people are waking up to a new reality
To how big we really are.
To how little control we really have.
To what really matters.
To Love.
So we pray and we remember that
Yes there is fear.
But there does not have to be hate.
Yes there is isolation.
But there does not have to be loneliness.
Yes there is panic buying.
But there does not have to be meanness.
Yes there is sickness.
But there does not have to be disease of the soul
Yes there is even death.
But there can always be a rebirth of love.
Wake to the choices you make as to how to live now.
Today, breathe.
Listen, behind the factory noises of your panic
The birds are singing again
The sky is clearing,
Spring is coming,
And we are always encompassed by Love.
Open the windows of your soul
And though you may not be able
to touch across the empty square,
Sing.

 


 

“A Prayer for Our Times,” by Cindy Schmersal, vice president for Mission and Ministry 

Ever-faithful Companion,  

Help us to always find You, God, in all things, 

especially in this time of uncertainty, 

as we navigate disruptions to the familiar and heightened anxieties. 

  

Make us attentive  

to the kernels of hope,  

in-breaks of joy, 

and invitations to stillness that subtly saturate our lives. 

In these gifts and in all glimpses of grace, 

may we find sustenance.  

  

Remind us often of our call to community. 

And, in responding to the need for social distancing, 

awaken us to the summons to foster creative community. 

Inspire us to reach beyond the boundaries of isolation. 

In so doing, help us to link heart and hand 

with You in caring for the vulnerable 

and in laboring for a more compassionate and humane world 

at this time and at all times. 

 


Video message from Fr. Curran

 


“Pandemic,” by Lynn Ungar

 

What if you thought of it

as the Jews consider the Sabbath—

the most sacred of times?

Cease from travel.

Cease from buying and selling.

Give up, just for now,

on trying to make the world

different than it is.

Sing. Pray. Touch only those

to whom you commit your life.

Center down.

And when your body has become still,

reach out with your heart.

Know that we are connected

in ways that are terrifying and beautiful.

(You could hardly deny it now.)

Know that our lives

are in one another’s hands.

(Surely, that has come clear.)

Do not reach out your hands.

Reach out your heart.

Reach out your words.

Reach out all the tendrils

of compassion that move, invisibly,

where we cannot touch.

Promise this world your love–

for better or for worse,

in sickness and in health,

so long as we all shall live.

 


Prayer for People Critically Ill or Facing Great Uncertainty, adapted from New Zealand Prayer Book, p. 765  

 

God of the present moment, 
God who in Jesus stills the storm 
and soothes the frantic heart; 
bring hope and courage to all 
who wait or work in uncertainty. 

Bring hope that you will make them the equal 
of whatever lies ahead. 

Bring them courage to endure what cannot be avoided, 
for your will is health and wholeness; 
you are God, and we need you. 
 


“Discerning a Path to God,” from the Rev. Arturo Sosa, S.J.

 

“Discernment in the Cave,” a four-part digital retreat

https://spark.adobe.com/page/HYFrtgRBpJtcv/

 


 Untitled poem by Laura Kelly Fanucci

 

When this is over, may we never again take for granted 

A handshake with a stranger 

Full shelves at the store 

Conversations with neighbors 

A crowded theater 

Friday night out 

The taste of communion 

A routine checkup 

The school rush each morning 

Coffee with a friend 

The stadium roaring 

Each deep breath 

A boring Tuesday 

Life itself. 

When this ends 

may we find 

that we have become 

more like the people 

we wanted to be 

we were called to be 

we hoped to be 

and may we stay 

that way — better 

for each other 

because of the worst. 

 


Video message from Fr. Curran

 


 Campus Ministry Wednesday Weekly Jam

Hyunki Yoon, D.M.A., performing “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”

 

Frank Macias performing “Strong Enough”

 


Video message from Fr. Curran