Physics Courses

PH 1200. The Art of Physics (3) 
Designed for non-science majors, this course explores the basic scientific viewpoint and develops elementary but effective techniques for formulating and solving vaguely stated problems. In addition, the course surveys the basic phenomenology of physics and some of its applications to chemistry, geology and technology. Prerequisite: high school algebra. Concurrently: PH 1210.

PH 1210. The Art of Physics Laboratory (1)
Selected experiments closely tied with PH 1200. Two hours per week. Laboratory fee. Concurrently: PH 1200.

PH 1500. Basic Electricity and Electronics (2) 
Basic electrical concepts including potential, 
current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, RC 
circuits, potentiometers and Wheatstone bridges. Basic electronic concepts including semiconductors, diodes, transistors, logic gates and flip-flops. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory every two weeks. Laboratory fee. Prerequisite: MT 1090 Calculus for Business or MT 1800 Calculus I, or concurrently.

PH 1600. Introduction to Astronomy (4) 
Spring semester
A survey of the solar system for non-science majors with a brief survey of the universe outside the solar system including galaxies and stellar energy. Lecture three hours a week, laboratory two hours a week. Laboratory fee. (SCI)

PH 1700. Physics Concepts and Connections I (3) 
Fall semester
An introduction to the study of physics with a conceptual concentration on Newtonian mechanics, the physics of fluids, and waves and sound through inquiry, discussion, demonstration, and hands-on activities. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual understanding and the applicability of physics to the students' major area of study and career interests. Physics topics that relate to the health and therapy fields will be stressed. Students will be expected to demonstrate conceptual and applied understanding of physics principles through class discourse, written assessment, and the design of projects utilizing physics principles in an application to an area of students' career interests. Recommended: MT 0100 or equivalent. Corequisite: PH 1710 (SCI Lecture and Lab combined).

PH 1710. Physics Concepts and Connections Laboratory I (1) 
Fall semester
Selected constructivist, inquiry-based laboratory activities to accompany PH 1700. Two hours a week. Laboratory fee. Corequisite: PH 1700 (SCI Lecture and Lab combined).

PH 1750. Physics Concepts and Connections II (3) 
Spring semester
A continuation of the study of physics principles introduced in PH 1700 with a concentration on the mathematical application of Newtonian mechanics to the human body, as well as a study of thermodynamics, waves and sound, electricity and light. Emphasis will be on both the conceptual understanding of physics principles and the mathematical application of physics principles in force, motion, torque, circular motion, work and energy, momentum, fluid pressure, thermodynamics, waves and sound, optics and electricity. Students will be expected to demonstrate conceptual and applied understanding of physics principles through class discourse, problem solving, written assessment, and the design of projects utilizing physics principles in an application to an area of students' career interests. Prerequisite: PH 1700. Recommended: MT 1190 or equivalent. Corequisite: PH 1760 (SCI or SCII Lecture and Lab combined).

PH 1760. Physics Concepts and Connections Laboratory II (1)
Spring semester
Selected experiments to accompany PH 1750. Two hours per week. Laboratory fee. Corequisite: PH 1750 (SCI or SCII Lecture and Lab combined).

PH 2300. The Phascination of Physics (3) 
Fall semester
A one-semester conceptual physics course designed to cover major physics topics in waves and sound, light and color and electricity/magnetism through inquiry-based hands-on activities, discussion, and demonstrations. Emphasis will be on conceptual understanding and the applicability of physics to the real everyday world. Students will be expected to demonstrate conceptual and applied understanding of covered physics principles through class discourse, written assessment, and the design of a project utilizing physics principles to be included in a "Haunted Physics Laboratory." Course projects will contribute to the development of a Halloween-related physics lab to be set up in October as an educational physics laboratory for all physics students - and potentially, the public. Recommended: MT 0100 or equivalent. Corequisite: PH 2310. (SCI or SCII Lecture and Lab combined)

PH 2310. The Phascination of Physics Laboratory (1) 
Fall semester
Selected constructivist inquiry laboratory activities in waves and sound, light and color, electricity/magnetism to accompany PH 2300. Laboratory activities will be intertwined with the lecture section during the evening class and on the four Saturday mornings. Laboratory fee. Corequisite: PH 2300. (SCI or SCII Lecture and Lab combined)

PH 2800. General Physics I (3) 
Fall and Spring semester
Principles of Newtonian mechanics and introduction to heat and thermodynamics employing calculus as needed and emphasizing the scientific method and physical reasoning. Concurrently: MT 1800 Calculus I and PH 2810. (SCI Lecture & Lab combined)

PH 2810. General Physics Laboratory I (1) 
Fall and Spring semester
Selected experiments to complement PH 2800. Two hours per week. Laboratory fee. Concurrently: PH 2800. (SCI Lecture & Lab combined)

PH 2900. General Physics II (3) 
Fall and Spring semester
Principles of classical electricity, magnetism and physical optics, making free use of calculus. Prerequisite: PH 2800. Concurrently: PH 2910. (SCI or SCII Lecture & Lab combined)

PH 2910. General Physics Laboratory II (1) 
Fall and Spring semester
Selected experiments to complement PH 2900. Two hours per week. Laboratory fee. Concurrently: PH 2900. (SCI or SCII Lecture & Lab combined)

PH 3400 (ES 3400). Engineering Thermodynamics (3) 
Spring semester
Basic thermodynamic principles from an engineering standpoint. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: PH 2800.

PH 3500 (ES 3500). Engineering Statics (3)
Fall semester
II and PH Basic principles of statics and introduction to strength of materials. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: PH 2800.

PH 3510 (CH 3510). Physical Chemistry I (3) 
Fall semester
Basic principles of physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamics, equilibria and kinetic theory. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: PH 2900, CH 3450 or instructor approval.

PH 3520 (CH 3520). Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (1) 
Fall semester
Experiments designed to illustrate basic theories in thermodynamics, equilibrium, etc. Laboratory three and a half hours a week. Lab fee. Prerequisite: CH 3450. Concurrently: PH 3510 (CH 3510).

PH 3530 (CH 3530). Physical Chemistry II (3) 
Spring semester
Basic principles of phase equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics, introduction to quantum mechanics and molecular structure. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: PH 3510 (CH 3510).

PH 3540 (CH 3540). Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (1) 
Spring semester
Experiments designed to illustrate basic theories in electrochemistry, kinetics, spectroscopy, etc. Laboratory three and a half hours a week. Lab fee. Concurrently: PH 3530 (CH 3530).

PH 3910. Advanced Laboratory I (2) 
Fall and Spring semester
Basic experiments in mechanics, electronics, optics, resonance phenomena and atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory four hours a week. Laboratory fee. Prerequisite: PH 2900.

PH 4010. Advanced Laboratory II (2) 
Fall and Spring semester
A continuation of PH 3910. Laboratory four hours a week. Laboratory fee. Prerequisite: PH 3910.

PH 4110. Advanced Laboratory III (2) 
Fall and Spring semester
A continuation of PH 4010. Laboratory four hours a week. Laboratory fee. Prerequisite: PH 4010.

PH 4210. Advanced Laboratory IV (2)
Fall and Spring semester
A continuation of PH 4110. Laboratory four hours a week. Laboratory fee. Prerequisite: PH 4110.

PH 4300. Electricity and Magnetism (3) 
Fall semester of even-numbered calendar year
Elements of vector analysis. Electrostatic fields and potentials, equations of Poisson and Laplace, magnetic fields and the vector potential, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell’s equations and plane electromagnetic waves. Electric and magnetic fields in material media. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: PH 2900 and MT 1810 Calculus II.

PH 4400. Physical Optics (3) 
Spring semester of odd-numbered calendar year
The nature of light, geometrical optics, optical instrumention, wave equations, superposition of waves, interference of light, polarization of light, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, and laser basics. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: PH 2900 and MT 1810 Calculus II.

PH 4500. Modern Physics (3) 
Spring semester of even-numbered calendar year
“Modern physics” is distinguished from “classical physics” not only by its youth (dating from about 1900) but also by its description of phenomena in startlingly different ways. The basic new theories are relativity and quantum mechanics, which form the basis for the description of “elementary particles,” nuclei, atoms, molecules and matter in its various states. This course begins with a study of special relativity and then turns to quantum theory, describing the empirical discoveries leading to each. Emphasis is placed on the meaning of these theories. Applications of quantum theory to the study of atoms, molecules and solids are studied. Prerequisites: PH 2900 and MT 1810 Calculus II.

PH 4550. Quantum Mechanics (3) 
This course deals with the Schrodinger equation and its implications: operators, eigenvalues and the interpretation of the wave function. Topics include angular momentum and spin, scattering theory, group theory, perturbation methods and quantum statistics. Prerequisites: PH 4500, PH 4600 and MT 3710 Applied Analysis.

PH 4600. Classical Mechanics I (3) 
Fall semester of odd-numbered calendar year
The Newtonian formulation of mechanics with applications to simple mechanical systems. Theory of damped oscillations. Dynamics of systems of particles and the conservation laws. Generalized coordinates. Hamilton’s principle and the Lagrangian formulation. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: PH 2800.

PH 4650. Classical Mechanics II (3) 
Continuation of PH 4600. Topics include 
Noether’s Theorem and special relativity. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisite: PH 4600.

PH 4960 (MT 4960). Physics Seminar (1) 
Expository presentations by junior and senior students on physics topics. Students learn presentation techniques through oral and written reports, poster presentations, and web page creation. Course required for the major.