English Courses

EN 1100. Reading and Study Skills (1-3) 
Intensive study and practice in the skills which make efficient students: note taking, outlining, paper writing, programmed reading to develop both rate and comprehension, listening skills and basic library research skills such as using the catalog, periodical indexes and bibliographies.

EN 1110. College Composition I (3) Fall semester
A course designed to assist students in achieving proficiency in college-level written composition. Includes study of and regular practice in the process of composing and editing as well as relating reading and writing. (Completing both EN 1110 and 1120 satisfies WCP.)

EN 1120. College Composition II (3) 
Spring semester
A course designed to assist students in achieving fuller proficiency in college-level written composition. Includes study of and regular practice in the process of composing and editing as well as relating reading and writing. A greater emphasis is placed upon analytical and interpretive writing; the documented thesis paper that employs research skills is also included. Prerequisite: EN 1110. (Completing both EN 1110 and 1120 satisfies WCP.)

EN 1140. English Composition (3) 
Fall and Spring semester
A one-semester course designed to study contemporary rhetorical strategies of composition through close analysis of sample essays which demonstrate skillful use of these principles, by regular written compositions employing designated rhetorical strategies, and by recalling the basic structures of the English language to develop a style appropriate to the audience. Prerequisite: dean’s approval. (WCP)

EN 1150. Honors Composition (3) 
Intensive study of written communication in three phases: information gathering, message preparation and process and style of delivery. Prerequisite: honors status or instructor approval. (WCP) 

EN 1180. The Research Paper (1)
This course deals with the basic areas of producing a college-level research paper: generating ideas, developing an adequate thesis, finding proper sources, evaluating sources and taking notes, avoiding plagiarism, integrating source material into a longer work, editing and proofreading, and using appropriate documentation style. A research paper based on these elements will be written in the course. Prerequisite: EN 1110 or equivalent.

EN 2740. World Literature Through the Sixteenth Century (3) 
This course explores representative works of world literature from antiquity to the early modern period, within a framework that compares cultures and historical periods and invites consideration of both what is shared among cultures and what is unique about the culture from which each text emerged. With emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing, the course examines several major genres of literature and studies themes, forms, and styles in the literary texts. Prerequisites: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LT I)

EN 2760. World Literature Since the Sixteenth Century (3) 
This course explores representative works of world literature from the early modern period to the present, within a framework that compares cultures and historical periods and invites consideration of both what is shared among cultures and what is unique about the culture from which each text emerged. With emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing, the course examines several major genres of literature and studies themes, forms, and styles in the literary texts. Prerequisites: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LT I) 

EN 2900-2989. Studies in World Literature
These courses provide a concentrated study of particular themes, genres, or periods of world literature, with emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing.  The "Studies" courses explore a broad range of representative works of world literature within a framework that compares cultures and historical periods and invites consideration of both what is shared among cultures and what is unique about the culture from which each text emerged. 

EN 2960. Journeys, Voyages, and Quests (3)
From Homer's Odyssey, through Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Voltaire's Candide, and Conrad's Heart of Darkness, to Achebe's Things Fall Apart, journeys, voyages, and quests have thematically structured literary works, enabling readers to venture abroad, experience new worlds, and to reflect on what they and the characters in particular works have learned along the way as well as their ports of call. Prerequisite: Writing Proficiency, EN 1110/1120, 1140; EN/HR 1150; or equivalent. (LT I) 

EN 3000. Major Figures of British Literature (3) 
This course examines a selection of major authors in the history of English literature with attention given to the developing traditions of English literature and to the use of various literary forms as they appear in the tradition. A selection is made from authors like the Beowulf Poet, Chaucer, the Pearl Poet, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Dryden, Pope, Swift, Blake, Wordsworth and Coleridge, Keats, Dickens, Browning, Hopkins, and Eliot. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII) 

EN 3110. Creative Writing (3) 
Introduction to the art of writing poetry and fiction. Emphasis on writer-teacher conferences. Best productions are published in the Rockhurst Review, the student literary and arts publication. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3140. Introduction to Playwriting (3) 
A course designed to introduce the student to the principles of playwriting including the scenario, plot structure, character, thought, diction, and spectacle. Some attention is given to the requirements of play production in script-writing. Regular creative exercises, workshop readings in the class, and the writing of original drama are required. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3150. Advanced Composition (3) 
Designed to assist students in mastery of writing techniques and to acquaint students with rhetorical principles and backgrounds useful in developing various types of written communication. Attention is given to rhetorical theories and their practical application through regular writing assignments. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3160. Writing for the Marketplace (3) 
The course covers four kinds of business documents: letters/memos, marketing/sales brochures, reports, and proposals. It includes editing strategies and techniques incrementally throughout the course. Design, graphics, layout, and analytical commentary are reviewed for structuring readable documents. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3170. Practical Stylistics (3) 
Designed to acquaint the student with the practical uses of stylistics by reviewing the place of vocabulary, syntax, register, and rhetorical context in written discourse as applied to specific goals of writing. Regular writing assignments are used to apply stylistic principles and readings are analyzed as models. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3180. Business Writing (3)
Theory and practice in writing business letters, memos and reports. Includes study of basic communication theory as it applies to writing in these forms. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3190. Technowriting: the Technologies of Written Communication from the Alphabet to the World Wide Web (3) 
This course focuses on four overlapping kinds of written applications based on network technology: e-mail, information sharing, document management, and office automation. With an ongoing emphasis on technologically based writing that incorporates the best of information available on the Internet, the World Wide Web, and developing multimedia technologies, the course’s purpose is to familiarize the student with the literacy requirements of the 21st century in a technological setting. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3220. Chaucer and His World (3) 
The primary focus of this course is Chaucer’s writing. The course begins with his earlier poetry and moves to an in-depth study of The Canterbury Tales. To gain greater insight into Chaucer’s works and his world, students are also introduced to short pieces by other writers of the period, as well as to the art, the music, the social background of the period. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3350. Shakespeare Seminar I (3) 
An intensive study of the poetry and plays of Shakespeare in their language, structure, backgrounds, characters, and criticism for English majors and those with a deep interest in Shakespeare. Selections are made from the range of Shakespeare’s works. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3360. Shakespeare Seminar II (3) 
An intensive study of a different selection of the poetry and plays of Shakespeare in language, structure, backgrounds, characters, and criticism for English majors and those with a deep interest in Shakespeare. Selections are made from the range of Shakespeare’s works. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3380. Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama (3)
This course is designed as a survey of the major plays and sonnets of Shakespeare chosen from the comedies, tragedies, and final romances along with a comparative study of the drama of other great Renaissance playwrights like Webster, Ford, and Marlowe. It studies the drama as a genre that encompasses several sub-genres and look at Elizabethan language usage, backgrounds, character, and literary criticism of the dramas. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3400. British Literature: 17th and 18th Centuries (3) 
Exploring major themes of Restoration and 18th Century British Literature, e.g., human sinfulness, social unrest, political corruption, economic change, the course focuses upon political and social satirists like Dryden, Swift, and Pope; novelists like DeFoe, Fielding, and Richardson; dramatists like Dryden, Wycherley, and Sheridan; essayists like Addison, Steele, and Johnson; and, above all, poets like Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Smart and Collins. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3500. Studies in the English Novel (3) 
Early influences and major trends in the development of the English novel. Emphasis on the form and themes of prose fiction as they appear in Richardson, Fielding, Austen, Scott, Emily Brontë, Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, Hardy, Conrad, Forster, Lawrence and Joyce. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3520. Jane Austen Study (3)
An intensive study of selections from the body of Jane Austen’s work, the course is divided into three areas of interest. The primary focus begins on two representative novels, their place in Austen’s developing technique, and a review of the criticisms – both historical and present day – that influenced readers of the novels from the beginning until now. The middle section of the course centers on selected letters and excerpts from influential biographical works. The final highlight of the course is the viewing and reviewing of the recent revival of Austen’s work in the cinema and the critical response thereto. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3530. The Romantic Period (3) 
Exploring major themes of English Romanticism, e.g., rebellion, self-assertion, primacy of feelings, imaginative perception, the course focuses upon social critics like Mary Wollstonecraft and Thomas Paine; novelists like Mary Shelley and the Brontë sisters; and, above all, poets like Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150, and one Level I Literary Mode course. (LTII)

EN 3550. The Victorian Period (3) 
A study of Victorian literature, including poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction prose, the course explores the work of authors such as Tennyson, Hopkins, Arnold, the Brownings, Rossetti, Dickens, Hardy, Wilde, Shaw, Carlyle, Mill, and Newman. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3600. American Literature I (3) 
A survey of American literature from its beginning to the Civil War, with emphasis upon Edward Taylor, Franklin, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville and Whitman as representatives of the colonial, neoclassical and romantic periods. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3610. American Literature II (3) 
A continuation of the survey begun in EN 3600. Covers from post-Civil War to the 1940’s. Chief stress is on Whitman, Twain, Howells, Dickinson, James, Crane, Frost, Eliot, Pound, W. C. Williams, Wallace Stevens, Hemingway, Faulkner and ethnic dimensions. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII) 

EN 3670. Studies in the American Novel (3) 
An inquiry into how novelists manage such formal elements as character, world, plot and point of view as well as thematic and stylistic patterns. Intensive analysis of Melville, James, Dreiser, Cather, Dos Passos, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison, Bellow and others. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3680. Twentieth Century U.S. Drama (3)
This course studies 1) plays that have contributed to the development of American theater and 2) drama theory – from Aristotle to the present day – relating to tragedy and comedy, to realism, naturalism, expressionism, and surrealism, to theater of social protest, theater of the absurd, etc. Readings include plays of Eugene O’Neill, Thornton Wilder, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, William Gibson, Edward Albee, Horton Foote, Mark Medoff, August Wilson, etc. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3700. The Structure of Modern English (3) 
A study of contemporary English, considering various approaches including traditional, structural and transformational grammars. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3750. Development of the English Language (3) 
A study of the history of English, its relationships with other languages, its linguistic changes, structure and dialects. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3820. American Literature and the Environment (3) 
In this course, students explore environmental issues as they are expressed both explicitly and implicitly in literary texts. In this two-fold strategy, the primary approach is to study texts that establish environment as their principal focus, works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction broadly classed as “nature writing.” The second approach is to examine the implicit treatment of environment within literary works whose focus is not primarily environmental. Both approaches expose students to writers from diverse cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3830. Utopian and Anti-Utopian Literature (3) 
Emphasis on the many speculations as to what life in the future might be like, both hopes and fears. Readings include Plato’s The Republic, More’s Utopia, Canticle for Leibowitz, Brave New World and A Clockwork Orange. Prerequisite: EN 1110/ 1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3840. Honors Literature and Art (3) 
This interdisciplinary seminar format course studies the presentation of experience in literature and in the visual arts. With the aim of exploring questions about civilization and culture, the quality of progress, the nature of the world and of the human person, the focus is on works conveying such themes as man in the wilderness, the individual vs. society, the hero and the antihero and the quest for meaning and transcendence. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150, and honors status or instructor approval.

EN 3850. Literature and Cinema (3) 
This course explores the filmed stories that come out of written literature. For instance, Tom Jones, the novel, is condensed and simplified; Romeo and Juliet is shortened and parts are cut down. Sometimes, as with Dorian Gray, we have several movie attempts. In this course we read texts that have been filmed, see the films, and do written analyses of the relative success/ failure of the efforts. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 3870. Irish Literature (3)
This course will survey Irish writing in English, with emphasis on the literature of the early 19th century to the present. It will consider, in particular, works of major figures such as James Joyce, W.B. Yeats, G.B. Shaw, Seamus Heaney, and Brian Friel, as well as the contexts of Irish history and cultural politics. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3880. The Gothic Novel as Genre (3)
Gothic fiction, a reaction against comfort, security, political stability, and commercial progress, resists the rule of reason. It began with the 1764 publication of Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, and prospered through its steady reference to crags and chasms, torture and terror, and the supernatural – clairvoyance, dreams, ghosts. This course studies a series of representative texts that establish and sustain the genre from the 18th century to now. Prerequisite: EN 1110/EN 1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3885. The Contemporary Novel (3) 
A study of some of the most recognized and noteworthy long fiction of the prior twenty-five years, the course will consider the work of writers such as Toni Morrision, Philip Roth, Ian McEwan, A. S. Byatt, David Lodge, and Salman Rushdie, as well as recent theories of the novel and cultural contexts that bear on the creation, publication, and reception of such works. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120 or EN 1140 or EN 1150.

EN 3890. Women and Literature (3) 
This course offers a selection of fiction and poetry by women and about issues traditionally considered important to women. Fiction includes, but is not limited to, works by Kate Chopin, Virginia Woolf, Willa Cather, Alice Walker, and Rachel Ingalls. Poetry includes, but is not limited to, works by Emily Dickinson, Gwendolyn Brooks, Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, and Rita Dove. Essays by such authors as Virginia Woolf, Simone de Beauvoir, Catherine McKinnon, and Mary Daley are used to complement the poetry and fiction. The course begins with consideration of Virginia Woolf’s contention that in order to create, a woman needs an independent income and a room of her own. Emphasis is on the works of literature as literature. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 3896. The Literature of Catholicism and Christian Spirituality (3) 
This course will analyze works of literature that explore the Catholic faith, the sacramental experience of Catholicism, and Christian spirituality depicted in human relationships with Christ. The course further highlights issues common to major writers across the centuries, e.g., problems of evil and sinfulness, anguish over personal salvation, the beauty and goodness of God's creation, the unconditional love of God. To accomplish these aims, the course introduces students to poets like John Donne, George Herbert, and Gerard Manley Hopkins; narrative artists like Graham Greene, Flannery O'Connor, and Ron Hansen; dramatists like Thomas Bolt and T.S. Elliot; spiritual autobiographers like Thomas Merton and Therese of Lisieux. Prerequisites: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII) 

EN 4120. Introduction to Screenwriting (3)
This course provides an introduction to the foundations of screenwriting, including generating ideas, finding a subject, building characters, developing a plot through a beginning, a confrontation, and a resolution, designing individual scenes to advance the story, building momentum for an audience, and achieving a convincing climax. The primary purpose of the course is the production of a complete written script that fulfills the specialized needs of this particular writing genre. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 4150. The Tradition of Rhetoric: Principles and Practices (3)
This course examines rhetorical history and theory as it started in classical Greece, developed in ancient Rome, was modified in medieval times, and matured into modern times. The use of rhetoric as a practical force, as a base in the academic tradition, as part of modern media (including the work of Walter J. Ong), and as a necessary part of pedagogy in teaching is reviewed in its methods and concepts as a valuable principle in human communication. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4170. The Teaching of Writing (3)

This course will explore the teaching of writing, both in theory and in practice, by considering an array of approaches, methods, and techniques that inform current research on best practices in composition pedagogy. An intensive, upper-division seminar that focuses on techniques needed by secondary-school teachers of English, topics may include designing writing assignments, the role of reading in writing, teachers' comments and feedback, and assessment. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150; junior, senior or graduate standing; or department approval.


EN 4180. Report Writing (3) 
Intensive course in the writing of reports usual in business, institutions and government. Includes research, layout and graphics. One original project required. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150.

EN 4190. Literature and Orality: A Rhetorical Synthesis (3) 
A course that studies the oral basis of modern writing beginning with oral epics and continuing through Greek chirographic drama into the modern typographic novel. Works that present rhetorical backgrounds (Aristotle, Horace, Longinus) are reviewed to synthesize the rhetorical forms with the literature. Recent work on literacy theory is also examined along with the implications of this work for the written and spoken word. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4600. Twentieth Century British and American Poetry (3) 
A survey of the principal figures and major developments in 20th century British and American poetry from Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Stevens and Williams to contemporary poets. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4610. African American Literature (3) 
This course studies major works by major African American writers by addressing one or two selected themes developed in a variety of genres. The authors studied, predominantly of the 20th century, spans several literary movements, beginning with pre-Civil War writings and moving through the post-1960’s avant garde period. The primary aims of the course include deepening students’ awareness of the social and literary contributions of African Americans to the larger body of American literature and exploring the ways African Americans define themselves and their unique culture in their literature. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII) 

EN 4620. The Novels of Faulkner (3) 
Study of the themes in Faulkner’s novels. Readings include The Unvanquished, Intruder in the Dust, The Bear, Spotted Horses, Old Man, As I Lay Dying and Absalom, Absalom. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4640. Americans in Paris (3)
In this course students examine poetry and fiction of American writers who found community and artistic inspiration in the City of Light during the early decades of the 20th century, especially in the entourage of Gertrude Stein. She labeled them “A Lost Generation.” While such writers as T.S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, may have felt alienated and dispossessed, they gave American Literature its modern vision. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4810. Mythology: Literature and Criticism (3) 
The course begins with a survey of Greek and Roman mythology and considers its influence on literature along with definitions of mythology. Selected authors are read to familiarize students with the use of myth in literary works. Selected myths from west to east are examined according to modern classifications of mythic themes. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4820. Literary Theory: Text and Context (3) 
An intensive upper-division seminar that focuses on techniques derived from historical as well as mid- and late-20th century literary criticism to examine literary texts and the role that literary theory has played in our understanding of the concept of literature, per se. Applying a variety of theory-based methodologies to selected poems, short stories, and novels, the course introduces the student to both the literature and the theoretical constructs that have helped form what has become the modern institutions of literary culture. The impact of such approaches as diverse as traditional, authorial intensions; text-centered analyses; and the more intense, linguistic focus of recent history will be combined with applied textual analysis techniques that reveal different, yet not altogether opposing, insights into a representative sample of texts as diverse as Andrew Marvel’s “To His Coy Mistress,” William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown,” and Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use”, to name a few. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150; and junior standing or above. (LTII)

EN 4830. Honors Classic to Romantic (3) 
While comparing views of Neoclassical and Romantic British literature, e.g., regarding human nature, social and political change, truth, imagination, objectivity and subjectivity, the course focuses on major writers of the respective periods: poets like Dryden and Keats; novelists like Defoe and the Brontës; dramatists like Sheridan and Shelley; literary theorists like Dryden, Pope, Johnson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats. In addition, the course takes up issues and events (e.g., the Bloodless Revolution and the French Revolution) which comprise the intellectual contexts of both periods. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150, and honors status or instructor approval. (LTII)

EN 4845. Short Fiction and Metaphor: 19th Century America (3) 
This is an intensive upper-division seminar that focuses on metaphor in the fictional prose works (as opposed to the poetry) of the nineteenth century, both in America and on the Continent. Highlighting foundation texts that have contributed significantly to the development of prose, this course will explore a wide range of writers that were attempting to broaden the concept of literature, per se, during this time period. The purpose here is to apply metaphorical theory and methodologies, from Aristotle to the present, to the fiction of authors such as Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Guy de Maupassant. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII) 

EN 4850. Modern Drama (3) 
This course introduces the student to many of the major works in the modern theatre, starting with Henrik Ibsen and ending with David Mamet. Response papers approach the problems of casting, directing, or interpreting a play based on the student’s knowledge of the author’s intent. Longer papers explore in more depth with the use of secondary sources some problem in one or more plays that is a theme of twentieth-century drama. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4855. Colonialism and Literature (3) 
An inquiry into the relationships between British literature and the empire from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries, the course will explore works by writers such as Shakespeare, Swift, Dickens, Kipling, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, and Woolf. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4860. Postcolonialism and Literature (3) 
Exploring a variety of themes (identity, tradition, change, and cultural values, for example) in the literature of colonized nations such as Ireland, India, and Nigeria, the course focuses on the global phenomenon of postcolonialism in the works of major 20th century writers such as James Joyce, Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, Wole Soyinka, and Anita Desai. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150. (LTII)

EN 4880. Poetry of Ecstasy (3)
Since Sapho, Lyric poetry by definition celebrates the emotions. Certain poets intensify the language and passions of this already avid genre to the level of ecstacy. This course will examine in detail the works of several modern poets with a view to understanding the techniques they used to heighten the tone and meaning of their writings. Poets to be studied may include William Wordsworth, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Anne Sexton, and Sylvia Plath. Prerequisite: EN 1110/1120, or EN 1140, or EN 1150, or equivalent. (LTII)

EN 4920. Report Project (3) 
This course prepares the student to develop an extensive report project and prepare both a written report and an oral presentation with participation of faculty from areas relevant to the student’s project. This course is also available as an advanced offering in the writing track of the English major. Prerequisite: EN 4180.