Economics Courses

EC 1000. Principles of Macroeconomics (3) A first course in macroeconomics, a social science, that introduces students to theories of how the economy operates and demonstrates the interrelationships of macroeconomic policies, national debt, inflation and unemployment. From primary information sources and educational media, students learn to hypothesize, gather data and test fundamental economic relationships, as well as learn to anticipate the performance of the overall economy. Prerequisite: Freshman standing. (SRI)

EC 1050. Honors Macroeconomics (4) A first course in macroeconomics, a social science, that introduces students to theories of how the economy operates and demonstrates the interrelationships of macroeconomic policies, national debt, inflation and unemployment. From primary information sources and educational media, students learn to hypothesize, gather data and test fundamental economic relationships, as well as learn to anticipate the performance of the overall economy. This course takes the place of EC 1000 for honors students. Freshman standing. (SRI)

EC 1100. Principles of Microeconomics (3) A first course in microeconomics, a social science, that introduces students to theories of how consumers and producers interact through supply and demand within the economy. This course helps students in developing a scientific approach to studying economic systems such as modern capitalism. Students investigate the structure of market behavior, performance in the marketplace and optimizing behavior regarding consumer demand, revenues, costs and profits. Prerequisite: Freshman standing. (SRI)

EC 1150. Honors Microeconomics (4) A first course in microeconomics, a social science, that introduces students to theories of how consumers and producers interact through supply and demand within the economy. This course helps students in developing a scientific approach to studying economic systems such as modern capitalism. Students investigate the structure of market behavior, performance in the marketplace and optimizing behavior regarding consumer demand, revenues, costs and profits. This course takes the place of EC 1100 for honors students. Freshman standing. (SRI)

EC 3000. Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) Intermediate Macroeconomics is a social science that focuses on the fundamental determinants of output, employment, prices and interest rates. As an extension of the foundation built in Principles of Macroeconomics, critical economic factors and issues such as technology, the labor force, the capital stock and government policies are investigated. Students gain an understanding of the competing economic analyses explaining macroeconomic problems and the variety of possible alternatives for fiscal, monetary, investment and labor force policies. Prerequisites: EC 1000 or EC 1050, EC 1100 or EC 1150, statistics.

EC 3100. Intermediate Microeconomics (3) An advanced study of microeconomics that includes the study of consumer behavior, production theory and general equilibrium. Topics include indifference analysis, costs, isoquants and welfare economics. Prerequisites: EC 1000 or EC 1050, EC 1100 or EC 1150, statistics.

EC 3225. Health Care Issues: Economics and Policy (3) This class helps students develop an understanding of the public policy formulation and implementation process, as well as an awareness of the critical economic issues in American health care markets. It also provides an exposure to options for health care policy reform. Students are introduced to health service economic issues of access, technology, labor, equity and efficiency from both domestic and international perspectives. A prior course in economics is helpful. (SRII or SRI)

EC 3300 (FN 4300). Money and Banking (3) Overviews the financial and derivatives markets and the institutional environment in which these markets operate. Instruments traded in these markets (equities, bonds, currencies, options, futures, swaps, etc.) and the principles underlying price determination of these instruments is covered. The course also covers ALM (Asset Liability Management) for financial institutions. Prerequisites: EC 1000 or EC 1050, EC 1100 or EC 1150, statistics.

EC 3400. The Developing World: Economics, Politics and Culture (3) The Developing World has often been viewed through the lens of theory that evolved in the context of what is known as the Developed World. This seminar course assembles profiles of developing countries and regions from a wide variety of sources to give students a foundation to understand theories focused on the Developing World. Such a foundation includes examinations of the interacting forces of economics, culture, politics, and the natural world. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (SRII or SRI)

EC 3750. Law and Economics (3) The purposes of government intervention in markets are the focus of the course. The market failures that government is designed to correct are weighed against government failures. Industry studies are used to illustrate public choices about regulation, deregulation, antirust, and other legal interventions in markets. Students learn the role of property in our legal system and economic analysis. The structure of the U.S. and foreign legal systems are examined from an economic perspective. Students learn to read, interpret, and apply Supreme Court cases to economic analysis of markets. A prior course in economics is helpful. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. (SRII or SRI)

EC 3800 (MG 3800). Competitive Analysis: An International Perspective (3) A comprehensive course applies modern business and economic principles to study a firm's strategic position. The class integrates insights from the theory of the firm, industrial organization, game theory, and complexity analysis which are used in may fields besides Economics. The broad sweep of modern economics and strategy research is organized and presented on a wide variety of issues, such as defining boundaries, "make or buy fallacies", competitor identification, rivalry, commitment, cooperation, and strategic positioning. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above, BUS 3350 or equivalent, and EC 1100 (MK 3000 recommended).

EC 4001. Forecasting and Data Analysis for Decision Making (3) This course will provide students with the practical business and market research tools required for today's data-driven decision needs. Understanding your products, customers, competitors, employees and processes is essential to achieve competitive advantage. These business intelligence tools include market research, data mining, forecasting, financial modeling and industry research. This course will focus on the processes and analysis of data using software, not the mathematics. Prerequisites: EC 1000 or EC 1050, EC 1100 or EC 1150, introductory statistics and skills in using windows-based software.

EC 4200. International Economics (3) This course introduces the student to international trade, with emphasis on the balance of payments, foreign exchange rates and adjustments, the history of trade laws and current directions in free trade and protectionism. Prerequisites: EC 1000 or EC 1050, EC 1100 or EC 1150, statistics, BUS 3350 or EC 3000.

EC 4300. Political Economy: Economics Systems of the World (3) Capturing the essence and dynamism of economic systems is the focus of this course. In this discussion-based course, students will engage in critical reflection of the criteria for comparing economic systems, apply criteria to a self-determined research of particular economy, and examine the different types of economic systems. Particular topics include the role of culture in understanding systems, transitioning systems in Eastern Europe, the emerging role of Islam and issues particular to developing countries. (SRII)

EC 4400. Industrial Organization (3) The study of industrial organization provides a well-organized, widely accepted set of principles about the ways markets fail depending upon how they are structured, how governments do or do not intervene to correct marker failures, and the kinds of failures governments experience in trying to correct market failures. The course analyzes the structural characteristics, conduct patterns and social performance of industries with special attention given to major U.S. industries. The point of this analysis is to develop skill in analyzing whether or not government intervention is effective and desirable. Prerequisite, or concurrent with permission of the department: EC 1100; withdrawal from concurrent course will result in automatic drop of EC 4400. (SRI or SRII)

EC 4500. Applied Quantitative Methods (3) Course introduces applied concepts in mathematical analysis, statistics, and spreadsheet application. The focus is on providing a background in the quantitative methodology used in areas such as economics, finance, operations management, marketing, and management. Major topics include linear and non-linear functions, linear programming and statistical concepts. Waived in lieu of six hours of undergraduate statistics and quantitative analysis. This course cannot be taken by BSBA majors to apply toward the BSBA degree requirements. Prerequisite: Junior standing or post-baccalaueate pre-MBA student.

EC 4550. Principles of Economics (3) Course examines major topics including role of the price system, the factors which impact prices in resources and product markets, determinants of price level and national income, and the effects of governmental stabilization policies. Waived in lieu of six hours of macro and microeconomics. The course cannot be taken by BSBA majors to apply toward the BSBA degree requirements or by BA in Economics majors to apply towards the BA in Economics. Prerequisite: Junior standing or post-baccalaureate pre-MBA student.

EC 4940. Global Economic Issues (3) A seminar course which examines different economic paradigms to analyze current and controversial economic, environmental, political and social issues from a global perspective. Juxtaposition of the interpretations strengthens students' understanding of competing theories. Research and critical analysis of a chosen issue is presented by students as part of the course. Prerequisite or concurrent with permission of the department: EC 1000 or EC 1100; withdrawal from concurrent course will result in automatic drop of EC 4940. (GPR)