Business Administration Courses

Accounting | Business Administration | Decision Sciences | Economics | Finance | Management | Marketing

Accounting

AC 2000. Financial Accounting (3) 
A study of how organizations capture and use financial information for reporting and analysis. Topics include the accounting cycle, understanding financial statements and their account, and the preparation and analysis of income statements, balance sheets, and statements of cash flows.

AC 2100. Managerial Accounting (3) A study of accounting information needed for internal planning, decision making and control. Students study cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, product costing methods, budgeting, and variance interpretation. Prerequisite: AC 2000.

AC 3000. Intermediate Accounting I (3) The Intermediate Accounting sequence provides students with a foundation in the basic theory and principles underlying the preparation of financial statements of business entities. Basic computer and spreadsheet skills are expected. AC 3000 covers the foundations of financial accounting and reporting, including history of accounting, the conceptual framework and objectives of financial reporting, cash versus accrual basis, elements of financial statements, the complete accounting cycle, revenue and expense recognition, comprehensive income statement, balance sheet and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: AC 2100, Junior standing; prerequisite or concurrent: BUS 1800.

AC 3100. Intermediate Accounting II (3) Survey of financial accounting and reporting topics, including cash and receivables, inventories, tangible and intangible long-term assets, current and long-term liabilities, leases, pensions, deferred income taxes, owners' equity and distributions to shareholders and earnings per share. Prerequisite: AC 3000.

AC 3400. Advanced Managerial Accounting (3) An advanced study of cost and managerial accounting concepts. Course covers beyond the principles level the managerial and cost accounting concepts and application of such topics as cost methods, budgeting, variance analysis, and using information for management decision making. Prerequisite: AC 2100; prerequisite or concurrent: BUS 1800.

AC 3500. Accounting Information and Control Systems (3) A study of information systems and internal control environments. Course content includes understanding and testing the internal control environments, understanding and documenting the transaction cycles, and establishing and using database systems. Prerequisites: AC 3000.

AC 4050 (AC 6050). Advanced Accounting (3) Survey of advanced topics in financial accounting and reporting, including business combinations and consolidations, accounting for routine operations of state and local government entities and other nonbusiness entities, partnerships and personal financial statements, and foreign currency translation and transactions. Prerequisite: AC 3000.

AC 4201. Intermediate Financial Analysis (3) A second course in corporate finance that deepens the development of the analytical skills and knowledge of the student in analyzing financial information and understanding of the underlying accounting information. The course builds the theory and analysis skills of students in financial statement analysis and other topics including working capital management, capital structure and cost including dividend policy, key financial metrics, and valuation. Students will be expected to complete a major project that analyzes the statements and practices of corporate financial policies on these issues. Prerequisite: FN 3000.

AC 4450 (AC 6500). International Accounting Issues (3) This course examines the accounting and reporting of multinational corporations; the impact of culture and capital markets on countries' accounting concepts and standards; and the development of international and accounting standards. Prerequisites: AC 3000, BUS 3350, FN 3000.

AC 4500. Principles of Accounting (3) Course provides a foundation for students with no prior accounting experience. Financial and management basics are taught, but the emphasis is upon attainment of an overall understanding of the field. General topics include the preparation and interpretation of basic financial statements and the use of accounting information for managerial decision-making. Specific topics include the balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, and relevant cost analysis. Waived in lieu of six hours of undergraduate accounting. This course cannot be taken by BSBA majors to apply toward the BSBA degree requirements. Prerequisite: Junior standing or post-baccalaureate pre-MBA student.

AC 4600 (AC 6600). Corporate and Partnership Taxation (3) A study of major taxes and taxation issues as they pertain to corporations, partnerships and sole proprietorships. Emphasis is given to concepts, practice, research and communication of tax issues. Prerequisite: AC 3000.

AC 4650 (AC 6650). Individual Taxation (3) A study of federal and state taxation issues as they pertain to individuals. Emphasis is given to concepts, practice, research and communication of tax issues. Prerequisite: AC 3000.

AC 4750 (AC 6750). Auditing (3) Auditing is the capstone course that integrates accounting practice, business perspectives and environments, and auditing standards and procedures. Upon completion of the course, students will have demonstrated their ability to assess client business risk, perform an industry analysis, gather and evaluate audit evidence, evaluate internal control systems, and prepare audit reports. Analytical, written, and oral presentation skills are essential in this course. Prerequisite: AC 3500 or MIS 3100 or equivalent.

top

Business Administration

BUS 1000. Freshmen in Business Seminar (1) This course is designed to provide incoming freshmen with an overview of academic and social adjustment to college. Students are introduced to the missions of the Jesuits, Rockhurst University and the Helzberg School of Management. Additionally, students learn how the Rockhurst liberal arts core curriculum is an integral part of their educational experience, and how the theories, principles, and concepts studied in the core will be applied to life and to the study of the business major. Students also meet formally and informally with faculty and staff, and are introduced to the range of student support services that are available on campus.

BUS 1800. Microcomputer Applications (3) The course is designed to provide in-depth, hands-on experience with computers, the Internet, and the Microsoft Office suite of application programs. Coursework includes the removal and re-installation of computer hardware components, project-based work with the Microsoft Office suite of application programs including: Word (word processing), PowerPoint (presentation), Excel (spreadsheet), and Access (database), as well as hands-on work with the Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) web browser, Internet resources and searching strategies, and methods used to determine credibility of Internet-based reference resources. The course also incorporates a general, theoretical orientation to computers. There is substantial exposure to Microsoft Excel equations in the course. Successful completion of the course facilitates computer proficiency with the specified applications. Recommended: A fundamental knowledge of computers evidenced by a high school computer course or equivalent.

BUS 1900. Business Leadership and Social Issues (3) This course introduces the student to business. First, it will engage students in managerial concepts and skills relating to functional integration and the managerial processes of planning, organizing, and implementing. Second, students will deal with leadership issues, especially at the micro level, of influencing, working in teams, and developing self-awareness. Finally, these skills will be learned in the context of the external environment. That is, there is an emphasis on examining and analyzing social issues as they relate to corporate social responsibility and the firm's role in the macro social and community environment.

BUS 2000. Freshman Seminar Facilitator (1) Facilitators assist instructors in the Freshman Seminar by working with students in small groups to reinforce the concepts presented in class, discuss journal entries and to provide "tips" for a successful college experience. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

BUS 2200. Applied Business Statistics (3) An introduction to basic statistical techniques, especially for students in business and economics, this course involves understanding scientific method, collecting and analyzing data, inferential statistical procedures used for decision making under conditions of uncertainty and simple regression. Prerequisites: MT 1190, BUS 1800, and sophomore standing.

BUS 3091. Global Issues in Business and Culture (3) This course explores the culture and business practices in other countries and requires international travel. Through travel and participation in business and cultural activities with lectures by government officials, business managers and university faculty, students study the similarities and differences among the different cultures and business practices. Aspects examined include accounting, financing, marketing, and management methods. There is a course fee to cover partial travel costs. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

BUS 3350. Business in Global Environments (3) This course examines the international and ethical contexts in which trade, investment, and business decisions are made. It introduces the legal, economic, political, and cultural differences among countries and it examines how these differences affect the conduct of international business. It discusses a range of topics including bilateral, regional, and world trade agreements, foreign direct investment, and exchange rates. Finally, it introduces some of the strategic issues surrounding where companies should engage in international business and how they should expand into these markets.

BUS 3400. The Law of Commercial Transactions (3) An introduction to the study of law as it affects the business enterprise. The focus is on commercial transactions with special emphasis on contracts, contractual liabilities, sales contracts and secured transactions. Where appropriate, the connections between ethics and law are explored. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

top

Decision Sciences

DS 3200. Production Operations Management (3) This course provides a study of the production and operations functions within the modern industrial organization. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative techniques needed to improve decision making in the production/operations environment. Prerequisite: BUS 2200.

top

Economics

EC 2000. Principles of Macroeconomics (3) A first course in macroeconomics, a social science, that introduces students to theories of how the economy operates and demonstrates the interrelationships of macroeconomic policies, national debt, inflation and unemployment. From primary information sources and educational media, students learn to hypothesize, gather data and test fundamental economic relationships, as well as learn to anticipate the performance of the overall economy. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (SRI)

EC 2050. Honors Macroeconomics (4) A first course in macroeconomics, a social science, that introduces students to theories of how the economy operates and demonstrates the interrelationships of macroeconomic policies, national debt, inflation and unemployment. From primary information sources and educational media, students learn to hypothesize, gather data and test fundamental economic relationships, as well as learn to anticipate the performance of the overall economy. This course takes the place of EC 2000 for honors students. Sophomore standing. (SRI)

EC 2100. Principles of Microeconomics (3) A first course in microeconomics, a social science, that introduces students to theories of how consumers and producers interact through supply and demand within the economy. This course helps students in developing a scientific approach to studying economic systems such as modern capitalism. Students investigate the structure of market behavior, performance in the marketplace and optimizing behavior regarding consumer demand, revenues, costs and profits. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (SRI)

EC 2150. Honors Microeconomics (4) A first course in microeconomics, a social science, that introduces students to theories of how consumers and producers interact through supply and demand within the economy. This course helps students in developing a scientific approach to studying economic systems such as modern capitalism. Students investigate the structure of market behavior, performance in the marketplace and optimizing behavior regarding consumer demand, revenues, costs and profits. This course takes the place of EC 2100 for honors students. Sophomore standing. (SRI)

EC 3000. Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) Intermediate Macroeconomics is a social science that focuses on the fundamental determinants of output, employment, prices and interest rates. As an extension of the foundation built in Principles of Macroeconomics, critical economic factors and issues such as technology, the labor force, the capital stock and government policies are investigated. Students gain an understanding of the competing economic analyses explaining macroeconomic problems and the variety of possible alternatives for fiscal, monetary, investment and labor force policies. Prerequisites: EC 2000 or EC 2050, EC 2100 or EC 2150, statistics.

EC 3100. Intermediate Microeconomics (3) An advanced study of microeconomics that includes the study of consumer behavior, production theory and general equilibrium. Topics include indifference analysis, costs, isoquants and welfare economics. Prerequisites: EC 2000 or EC 2050, EC 2100 or EC 2150, statistics.

EC 3225. Health Care Issues: Economics and Policy (3) This class helps students develop an understanding of the public policy formulation and implementation process, as well as an awareness of the critical economic issues in American health care markets. It also provides an exposure to options for health care policy reform. Students are introduced to health service economic issues of access, technology, labor, equity and efficiency from both domestic and international perspectives. A prior course in economics is helpful. (SRII or SRI)

EC 3300 (FN 4300). Money and Banking (3) Overviews the financial and derivatives markets and the institutional environment in which these markets operate. Instruments traded in these markets (equities, bonds, currencies, options, futures, swaps, etc.) and the principles underlying price determination of these instruments is covered. The course also covers ALM (Asset Liability Management) for financial institutions. Prerequisites: EC 2000 or EC 2050, EC 2100 or EC 2150, statistics.

EC 3400. The Developing World: Economics, Politics and Culture (3) The Developing World has often been viewed through the lens of theory that evolved in the context of what is known as the Developed World. This seminar course assembles profiles of developing countries and regions from a wide variety of sources to give students a foundation to understand theories focused on the Developing World. Such a foundation includes examinations of the interacting forces of economics, culture, politics, and the natural world. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (SRII or SRI)

EC 3750. Law and Economics (3) The purposes of government intervention in markets are the focus of the course. The market failures that government is designed to correct are weighed against government failures. Industry studies are used to illustrate public choices about regulation, deregulation, antirust, and other legal interventions in markets. Students learn the role of property in our legal system and economic analysis. The structure of the U.S. and foreign legal systems are examined from an economic perspective. Students learn to read, interpret, and apply Supreme Court cases to economic analysis of markets. A prior course in economics is helpful. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. (SRII or SRI)

EC 3800 (MG 3800). Competitive Analysis: An International Perspective (3) A comprehensive course applies modern business and economic principles to study a firm's strategic position. The class integrates insights from the theory of the firm, industrial organization, game theory, and complexity analysis which are used in may fields besides Economics. The broad sweep of modern economics and strategy research is organized and presented on a wide variety of issues, such as defining boundaries, "make or buy fallacies", competitor identification, rivalry, commitment, cooperation, and strategic positioning. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above, BUS 3350 or equivalent, and EC 2100 (MK 3000 recommended).

EC 4001. Forecasting and Data Analysis for Decision Making (3) This course will provide students with the practical business and market research tools required for today's data-driven decision needs. Understanding your products, customers, competitors, employees and processes is essential to achieve competitive advantage. These business intelligence tools include market research, data mining, forecasting, financial modeling and industry research. This course will focus on the processes and analysis of data using software, not the mathematics. Prerequisites: EC 2000 or EC 2050, EC 2100 or EC 2150, introductory statistics and skills in using windows-based software.

EC 4200. International Economics (3) This course introduces the student to international trade, with emphasis on the balance of payments, foreign exchange rates and adjustments, the history of trade laws and current directions in free trade and protectionism. Prerequisites: EC 2000 or EC 2050, EC 2100 or EC 2150, statistics, BUS 3350 or EC 3000.

EC 4300. Political Economy: Economics Systems of the World (3) Capturing the essence and dynamism of economic systems is the focus of this course. In this discussion-based course, students will engage in critical reflection of the criteria for comparing economic systems, apply criteria to a self-determined research of particular economy, and examine the different types of economic systems. Particular topics include the role of culture in understanding systems, transitioning systems in Eastern Europe, the emerging role of Islam and issues particular to developing countries. (SRII)

EC 4400. Industrial Organization (3) The study of industrial organization provides a well-organized, widely accepted set of principles about the ways markets fail depending upon how they are structured, how governments do or do not intervene to correct marker failures, and the kinds of failures governments experience in trying to correct market failures. The course analyzes the structural characteristics, conduct patterns and social performance of industries with special attention given to major U.S. industries. The point of this analysis is to develop skill in analyzing whether or not government intervention is effective and desirable. Prerequisite, or concurrent with permission of the department: EC 2100; withdrawal from concurrent course will result in automatic drop of EC 4400. (SRI or SRII)

EC 4500. Applied Quantitative Methods (3) Course introduces applied concepts in mathematical analysis, statistics, and spreadsheet application. The focus is on providing a background in the quantitative methodology used in areas such as economics, finance, operations management, marketing, and management. Major topics include linear and non-linear functions, linear programming and statistical concepts. Waived in lieu of six hours of undergraduate statistics and quantitative analysis. This course cannot be taken by BSBA majors to apply toward the BSBA degree requirements. Prerequisite: Junior standing or post-baccalaueate pre-MBA student.

EC 4550. Principles of Economics (3) Course examines major topics including role of the price system, the factors which impact prices in resources and product markets, determinants of price level and national income, and the effects of governmental stabilization policies. Waived in lieu of six hours of macro and microeconomics. The course cannot be taken by BSBA majors to apply toward the BSBA degree requirements or by BA in Economics majors to apply towards the BA in Economics. Prerequisite: Junior standing or post-baccalaureate pre-MBA student.

EC 4940. Global Economic Issues (3) A seminar course which examines different economic paradigms to analyze current and controversial economic, environmental, political and social issues from a global perspective. Juxtaposition of the interpretations strengthens students' understanding of competing theories. Research and critical analysis of a chosen issue is presented by students as part of the course. Prerequisite or concurrent with permission of the department: EC 2000 or EC 2100; withdrawal from concurrent course will result in automatic drop of EC 4940. (GPR)

top

Finance

FN 3000. Essentials of Finance (3) An introduction to the important areas of corporate managerial finance. Emphasis is placed upon developing an understanding of the tools and methodologies available to the financial manager for decision making in such areas as capital budgeting, working capital management, capital structure and profit planning and control. Prerequisites: AC 2000 & AC 2100 or AC 4500; EC 2000 or EC 2050; EC 2100 or EC 2150 or EC 4550; statistics or EC 4550; BUS 1800; junior standing.

FN 4000. International Finance (3) The course addresses both theory and application of international financial and accounting issues. Emphasis is placed on foreign exchange management, including foreign exchange markets and instruments, measuring of foreign exchange positions. International accounting standards as well as multi-national capital budgeting, Eurocurrency and international bond markets are also discussed. Prerequisites: BUS 3350 and FN 3000.

FN 4110. Investments (3) An introduction to the development of an investment philosophy. The emphasis is on the development of a conceptual framework to implement that philosophy through an analysis of the appropriate analytical tools and methodologies. Specific topics include risk quantification, fundamental and technical analysis, ratio analysis applied to individual equities and the timing of investments. Prerequisite: FN 3000.

FN 4300 (EC 3300). Financial Markets and Institutions (3) Overviews the financial and derivatives markets and the institutional environment in which these markets operate. Instruments traded in these markets (equities, bonds, currencies, options, futures, swaps, etc.) and the principles underlying price determination of these instruments is covered. The course also covers ALM (Asset Liability Management) for financial institutions. Prerequisite: FN 3000.

top

Management

MG 3010. Principles of Management (3) Students will be immersed in a Management experience requiring them to make business decisions that involve all functional areas (eg., finance, marketing, advertising, human resources, etc.). This experience will have students doing the work of managers. Using this common experience as a reference point, students will explore the systemic context of management, including study of contemporary organizations. In addition, students will learn about important contextual variables of managers at various levels (top, middle, low). The traditional functional areas of finance, marketing, production/service, R&D will be explored within the possible organizational structural designs (simple, divisional, combination, virtual) and students will learn the internal and external constraints on managerial decision-making. Further managerial topics include strategy, structure, alignment, and their importance in addressing external environmental uncertainty. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and BUS 1900.

MG 3300. Leadership and Organizational Behavior (3) The course investigates how individual and group behavior impacts the performance of an organization. Topics include perception, personality, values, job satisfaction, emotional intelligence, learning, communication, motivation, culture, conflict, stress, and power/politics. The purpose of this course is to increase students' awareness of the impact that these topics have on leadership effectiveness. Prerequisite: junior standing, prerequisite or concurrent: BUS 1900.

MG 3500. Leadership Development (3) This course will assess the student's level of practical leadership behaviors (some of the behaviors may cross over and include management skills and abilities). The activities and study in this course will build on these existing skills and abilities. The course will also focus students on improving their skill and proficiency in the following leadership areas: decision-making (programmed and non-programmed), conflict resolution for/with others, influencing/persuading others, structuring uncertainty/ambiguity for others, coaching/developing others, delegating/following-up, building effective teams, and negotiating skills. Another outcome of the course will be for students to build self-awareness and acquire tools for life-long learning and self-exploration, including the ability to solicit and give feedback from and to peers. Prerequisite: MG 3010.

MG 3800 (EC 3800). Competitive Analysis: An International Perspective (3) This course applies modern business and economic principles to study a firm's strategic position. The class integrates insights from the theory of the firm, industrial organization, game theory, and complexity analysis which are used in many fields besides economics. The broad sweep of modern economics and strategy research is organized and presented on a wide variety of issues, such as defining boundaries, "make or buy fallacies," competitor identification, rivalry, commitment, cooperation, and strategic positioning. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above, BUS 3350 or equivalent, and EC 2100 (MK 3000 recommended).

MG 4170. Leadership in the 21st Century (3) Students will explore leadership issues as they relate to societal and business trends. Topics will include technology, the environment, and globalization as well as economic, political, cultural, and spiritual trends. The course will use historical and future perspectives to explore ways in which we might improve our world and the contributions business makes to this future. This course will follow a seminar format using a variety of resources including texts (non-business or business), periodicals, guest speakers, films, etc., to help inform the discussions and activities of the course. Prerequisites: MG 3010.

MG 4350. International Management (3) This course builds upon several key concepts introduced in BUS 3350 Business in Global Environments. It extends the discussion of how political, economical, legal, and technological developments are affecting the management of international business operations. It pays special attention to the role of culture and the challenges inherent in managing employees, operating facilities, and targeting markets across cultures. Finally, it examines the managerial and ethical implications of various international entry modes. Prerequisites: BUS 3350.

MG 4400. Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship (3) This course focuses on the unique issues facing the small business owner, as well as extensive coverage of critical business functions that the small business owner is likely to deal with that typically are not dealt with in other courses. The course also focuses on 1) how to assess a potential business opportunity and 2) how to prepare a business plan for use as both a strategic document and a document for dealing with potential financial backers. Prerequisites: MG 3300, MK 3000, FN 3000, senior standing.

MG 4940. Business Leadership: Strategy, Policy and Ethics (3) This course is an integrative capstone experience focusing on strategy and policy development for organizations within the context of sometimes conflicting ethical constraints. Strategy implementation challenges are also explored. The course provides an opportunity to integrate the knowledge drawn from functional area courses in the solution of problems discovered by the analysis of both published cases and live interactions with the managers of companies and organizations within the Kansas City region. Prerequisites: BUS 1900, BUS 3350, FN 3000 MG 3300, MIS 3100 (or AC 3500) MK 3000, senior standing.

top

MIS 3100. Management Information Systems (3) This course provides an historical and evolutionary introduction to management information systems, what they are, how they affect the organization and its employees, and how they can make businesses more competitive and efficient. Managing information requires understanding, designing, and controlling the information processing activities of an organization. This course focuses on the management of information and explores how firms (a) gather, (b) represent, (c) process, and (d) distribute information and knowledge to employees and customers. A sample of the topics covered in the course includes business intelligence, knowledge management, knowledge-worker productivity, data modeling, and group decision support systems.

top

Marketing

MK 3000. Principles of Marketing (3) This course briefly covers all the aspects of marketing that are covered in depth in the subsequent marketing courses. The student is introduced to marketing's 4Ps (Product, Price, Promotion, and Physical Distribution) something that everyone needs to know, no matter the career choice made. In this course you will learn the essential marketing vocabulary, basic principles and concepts, and how to use these principles when running your own business or working in an organization. The text is very important in this course and the student's learning is aided through the use of videos, presentations, class activities and discussions. Prerequisite: junior standing.

MK 3200. Consumer Behavior (3) This course is an application of behavioral scientist research into the field of marketing. Research conducted by psychologist, sociologists, social psychologists, economists, cultural anthropologists and other behavioral scientists are use to help us solve marketing problems. Students will learn why they tend to buy the products and services they do; and, how marketing practitioners can anticipate and predict buying behavior. In this course students give oral presentations, participate in team discussions, write short papers, do some critical thinking and view videos that demonstrate the application of marketing principles. Prerequisite: MK 3000 and junior standing.

MK 3350. International Marketing (3) This course addresses the global issues that impact concepts relevant to companies engaging the international marketplace. It introduces the student to the cultural, economic, geographic, political and legal issues that affect the where, when and how to enter foreign markets. The course uses contemporary materials to expand beyond the text and bring real life problems and solutions into the classroom for student discussion. Prerequisite: BUS 3350 and MK 3000.

MK 4100. Marketing Research (3) A thorough study of the various types of market research. Problems related to planning research, gathering and summarizing data and interpreting the findings are discussed and analyzed. The emphasis is on the practical use of market research in making market decisions. Actual market research projects are used to further this process. Prerequisites: MK 3000, introductory statistics, BUS 1800, and senior standing.

MK 4400. Personal Selling and Sales Management (3) Assess your own behavioral style and how to adjust it in order to influence others to accept your ideas. Learn the different ways of attracting and retaining customers. Discover how to obtain information from potential customers and use it to create a persuasive and dynamic sales presentation. Use the spin technique so that your customers handle their own objections and close their own sales. This is an experientially based course designed to improve all of your selling skills. Prerequisite: MK 3000, senior standing, and marketing concentration or instructor approval.

MK 4500. Marketing Policy (3) Learn how to run all aspects of a business, including what research is best to determine your customer needs, how finance impacts on marketing, and how does marketing and production need to be integrated to achieve your corporate goals. Compete against other students groups in the exciting microcomputer industry. Develop your own leadership style and learn how to transform your team into a high performing group which will enable them to achieve high profits and exceed customer expectations. Prerequisite: senior standing, marketing major.

top